MINISTRY OF ENDOWMENT
& RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque - Muscat

Omanisation

OmanisationThe Omanisation programme has been in operation since 1988, working toward replacing expatriates with trained Omani Personnel. But the real turning point in the jobs’ omanisation process happened in the middle of the nineties. With more than half of the total national population below the age of fifteen, new generations are coming massively on the job’s market.

The first omanisation laws were passed in October 1994 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour. This department announced percentages of omanisation to be adopted by the private sector, like 60% of nationals in transport, storage and communication, 45% in finance, insurance and real estate, 35% in industry, 30% in hotels and restaurants, 20% in wholesale and retail.

In 1995, the conference “Oman 2020-Vision for Oman’s economy” sets the employment of new generations as one of the two main goals of the country for the next twenty five years. The Sultan presented it as a “national challenge”.

The Omanisation Follow-up and Monitoring Committee were set up by in 1997, responsible for following up and monitoring plans and programmes, also in charge to determine the national economy’s manpower needs and prepare investment and recruitment plans in the public and private sectors.

By the end of 1999, the number of Omanis in government services exceeded the set target of 72%, and in most departments reached 86% of employees.

Since 2000 a “green card” is awarded to companies that meet their Omanisation targets and complies with the eligibility criteria for labour relations. Their names are published in the local press and they receive preferential treatment in their dealings with the Ministry.

In December 2001, the Ministry of Social Affairs split, creating a new ‘ministry of Manpower’, especially in charge of the omanisation question. For five years now, the ministry regularly announces the full omanisation of unskilled or low skilled professional activities.

In 2005, the omanisation effort focuses on jobs as heavy vehicles drivers, petrol pump attendants or hairdressers. The Ministry has also issued a decision regulating tourist guides, who are required to have a licence. It is providing career opportunities for Omanis who are encouraged to learn foreign languages so as to replace foreign tour guides.

Today, several major achievements can be underlined. Within the government sector, the share occupied by nationals reaches 82%, with scores higher than 90% in Omantel, the semi-public phone company, or in the Central Bank. Moreover, the figures have proven their efficiency in some sectors, like most of sales and service shops (shopkeepers, foodstuffs managers…).OmanisationThe Omanisation programme has been in operation since 1988, working toward replacing expatriates with trained Omani Personnel. But the real turning point in the jobs’ omanisation process happened in the middle of the nineties. With more than half of the total national population below the age of fifteen, new generations are coming massively on the job’s market.

The first omanisation laws were passed in October 1994 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour. This department announced percentages of omanisation to be adopted by the private sector, like 60% of nationals in transport, storage and communication, 45% in finance, insurance and real estate, 35% in industry, 30% in hotels and restaurants, 20% in wholesale and retail.

In 1995, the conference “Oman 2020-Vision for Oman’s economy” sets the employment of new generations as one of the two main goals of the country for the next twenty five years. The Sultan presented it as a “national challenge”.

The Omanisation Follow-up and Monitoring Committee were set up by in 1997, responsible for following up and monitoring plans and programmes, also in charge to determine the national economy’s manpower needs and prepare investment and recruitment plans in the public and private sectors.

By the end of 1999, the number of Omanis in government services exceeded the set target of 72%, and in most departments reached 86% of employees.

Since 2000 a “green card” is awarded to companies that meet their Omanisation targets and complies with the eligibility criteria for labour relations. Their names are published in the local press and they receive preferential treatment in their dealings with the Ministry.

In December 2001, the Ministry of Social Affairs split, creating a new ‘ministry of Manpower’, especially in charge of the omanisation question. For five years now, the ministry regularly announces the full omanisation of unskilled or low skilled professional activities.

In 2005, the omanisation effort focuses on jobs as heavy vehicles drivers, petrol pump attendants or hairdressers. The Ministry has also issued a decision regulating tourist guides, who are required to have a licence. It is providing career opportunities for Omanis who are encouraged to learn foreign languages so as to replace foreign tour guides.

Today, several major achievements can be underlined. Within the government sector, the share occupied by nationals reaches 82%, with scores higher than 90% in Omantel, the semi-public phone company, or in the Central Bank. Moreover, the figures have proven their efficiency in some sectors, like most of sales and service shops (shopkeepers, foodstuffs managers…).